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Global Paper JON NEW - Goldman Sachs

Global economics paper no 153January 22, 2007, Global Economics Paper No. 153 – ‘The N-11 More than an Acronym’ March 28, 2007. Ten key areas where reform is needed. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the impact of e-commerce on international trade and employment. Electronic commerce offers economy-wide benefits to all countries. The gains are likely to be concentrated in developed countries in the short run but, developing countries will have more to benefit in the long run. The volume of international trade will increase via e-commerce. The countries open to imports from high-income economies will benefit from knowledge spillovers. Next


Global Economics Paper No 153 The N-11 More Than an Acronym

Global economics paper no 153GS GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEBSITE. Economic Research from the GS Institutional Portal at https//com. Global Economics Paper No 153. March 28, 2007. Dominic Wilson and Anna Stupnytska. Thanks to Jim O'Neill, Sandra Lawson. Tushar Poddar, Ashok Bhundia. Pablo Morra and Salman Ahmed for advice and. As “an increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere,” either by “human industry and agriculture” or by natural causes like the Earth has “experienced numerous” times “through its history.”[1] * Some writers use the phrases “global warming” and “climate change” to mean temperature changes strictly caused by human activity.[2] [3] [4] Other writers use adjectives such as “man-made” and “anthropogenic” to distinguish between human and non-human causes.[5] [6] (“Anthropogenic” means “of human origin,”[7] and “AGW” stands for “anthropogenic global warming.”[8]) * Just Facts’ Standards of Credibility require the use of “language that is precise and unambiguous.” Hence, when human causes are stated or implied, this research uses terms like “man-made” and “human-induced.” * The greenhouse effect is a warming effect caused by certain gases that retain heat from sunlight.[9] Without such gases, the average surface temperature of the Earth would be below freezing, and as explained by the , “life, as we know it, would not exist.”[10] The global warming debate is centered upon whether added greenhouse gases released by human activity will overheat the Earth and cause harmful effects.[11] * Human activities currently release about 37 billion metric tons of CO2 per year, which equates to about 5% of natural CO2 emissions. Natural processes absorb the equivalent of all natural emissions plus about 57% of man-made emissions, leaving an additional 16 billion metric tons of CO2 in the atmosphere each year.[36] † In permafrost regions, perennial snow accumulations trap air bubbles that leave records of past airborne CO2 concentrations,[38] [39] [40] and because regional CO2 concentrations vary by less than 10 parts per million over the Earth, these local records are globally representative.[41] [42] * Instruments located on satellites can measure certain properties of oxygen that vary with temperature. Data from these instruments is used to calculate the average temperatures of different layers of the Earth’s atmosphere.[44] [45] * The lowermost layer of the atmosphere, which is called the “lower troposphere,” ranges from ground level to about five miles (8 km) high.[46] [47] According to satellite data correlated and adjusted by the National Space Science and Technology Center at the University of Alabama Huntsville, the average temperature of the lower troposphere increased by 0.60ºF (0.33ºC) between the 1980s and 2000s, mostly from 1997 to 2010: * Sources of uncertainty in satellite-derived temperatures involve variations in satellite orbits, variations in measuring instruments, and variations in the calculations used to translate raw data into temperatures.[51] [52] * According to temperature measurements taken near the Earth’s surface that are correlated and adjusted by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the Earth’s average temperature warmed by 1.5ºF (0.8ºC) between the 1880s and 2000s, mostly during 1907–19–2014: * According to temperature measurements taken near the Earth’s surface that are correlated and adjusted by the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia in the U. K., the Earth’s average temperature warmed by 1.4ºF (0.8ºC) between the 1850s and 2000s, mostly during 1911-19-1998: * Sources of uncertainty in surface temperature data involve “very incomplete” temperature records in the earlier years,[58] “systematic changes in measurement methods,”[59] “calculation and reporting errors,”[60] [61] [62] [63] [64] [65] [66] data adjustments that are performed when instruments are moved to different locations,[67] instrument precision,[68] instrument positioning,[69] and missing documentation/raw data.[70] [71] definitive assessment of uncertainties is impossible, because it is always possible that some unknown error has contaminated the data, and no quantitative allowance can be made for such unknowns.[72] * Oceans constitute about 71% of the Earth’s surface.[73] Changes in air temperature over the world’s oceans are typically based on measurements of water temperature at depths varying from less than 3 feet to more than 49 feet.[74] [75] This data is combined with changes in air temperature over land areas to produce global averages.[76] [77] contrasted water and air temperature changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean using three sources of measurements. One of these was a series of buoys, each containing thermometers located ten feet above the water and at one foot below the water. Next


Global Economics Paper No 152 - Verbundzentrale des

Global economics paper no 153Global Economics Paper No 152 GS GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEBSITE Economic Research from the GS Institutional Portal at https//com India's Rising Obtained his Bachelor and Masters Degrees, respectively, from the University of Hong Kong and the University of Essex. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1990, Cheung joined the University of California in Santa Cruz. Cheung is a professor in the Economics Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Currently, Cheung is the Hung Hing Ying Chair Professor of International Economics, Department of Economics and Finance, City University of Hong Kong. He has been appointed as the vice chair of the Department, served on various departmental and university committees, and directed Masters and Ph. Concurrently, Cheung is member of the Council of Advisers, HKIMR/HKMA, a Research Fellow of the CESifo in Germany, a founding and board member of the Methods in International Finance Network in Europe, and a Chair Professor of the Shandong University. Cheung is included in The America’s Registry of Outstanding Professionals, the Academic Keys Who's Who in Social Sciences Higher Education, Who’s Who in Economics, Who’s Who in America, and Who’s Who in the World. Cheung's areas of research include econometrics, applied econometrics, exchange rate dynamics, asset pricing, output fluctuation, and economic issues in Asian Economies. His research results have been published in over 100 refereed articles, which appeared in more than 40 academic journals including Econometric Theory, Game and Economic Behavior, Journal of Business & Economics Statistics, Journal of Econometrics, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of Finance. Cheung coauthored a book on Financial Options (in Chinese) and a book on The Economic Integration of Greater China. Next


Goldman Sachs Global Economics Paper

Global economics paper no 153Goldman Sachs Global Economics Paper No.153, The N-11 More than an Acronym 226 – Economics How to Become a Leader in an Emerging New Global Market: The Determinants of French Wine Exports, 1848-1938 María Isabel Ayuda, Hugo Ferrer-Pérez & Vicente Pinilla AAWE Working Paper No. 218 – Business Use of Knowledge Intensive Services in the Chilean Wine Industry. Fulvia Farinelli, Karina Fernandez-Stark, Javier Meneses, Soledad Meneses, Nanno Mulder & Karim Reuse AAWE Working Paper No. Galmarini, Lucie Dufau, Anne Loiseau, Michel Visalli & Pascal Schlich AAWE Working Paper No. 216 – Economics 􏰀Wine and cheese: two products or one association? 211 – Economics Vertical differentiation, Perceptions Restructuring, and Wine choices: the case of the Gran Selezione in Chianti Wines Marco Costanigro, Gabriele Scozzafava & Leonardo Casini AAWE Working Paper No. 208 – History and Politics Standards, Tariffs and Trade: The Rise and Fall of the Raisin Trade Between Greece and France in the Late 19th Century and the Definition of Wine Giulia Meloni & Johan Swinnen AAWE Working Paper No. 200 – Economics Importance of eco-logo and closure type on consumer expectations, price perception and willingness to purchase wines in Canada Paulo Lopes, Richard Sagala & Larry Lockshin AAWE Working Paper No. 115 – Economics How the liberalization of planting rights will affect the wine sector of Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany: a partial equilibrium analysis Mariia Bogonos, Barbara Engler, Marc Dressler, Jurgen Oberhofer & Stephan Dabbert AAWE Working Paper No. 189 – Economics The Costs and Benefits of Collective Reputation: Who gains and who loses from generic promotion programs? 113 – Business A Comparison of Wine Purchasing Behaviors in Ireland and California When the Celtic Tiger Roared Marianne Mc Garry Wolf, David Dudley, Megan Ginny Rood, Sarah Geraghty & Ann M. 112 – Business Using Social Media for Collaboration About Industry News in Higher Education Marianne Mc Garry Wolf, Mitch Wolf, Leanne Brady, Hanna Peszynski, Lindsey Higgins & Shane Wolf AAWE Working Paper No. 78 – Economics INFREQUENCY OF PURCHASE, INDIVIDUAL HETEROGENEITY AND RATIONAL ADDICTION IN SINGLE HOUSEHOLDS’ ESTIMATES OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION Pierpaolo Pierani & Silvia Tiezzi AAWE Working Paper No. Olivier Gergaud, Florine Livat, Bradley Rickard & Frederic Warzynski AAWE Working Paper No. 133 – Economics An agency-oriented model to explain vine-growing specialization in the province of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in the mid-nineteenth century Marc Badia-Miró & Enric Tello AAWE Working Paper No. 101 – Economics Do Consumers Exploit Precommitment Opportunities? 95 – Economics Regulating the availability of beer, wine, and spirits in grocery stores: Beverage-specific effects on prices, consumption, and traffic fatalities Bradley J. 41 – Business Increasing domestic consumption of South African wines: Identifying the key market segments of the “Black Diamonds” Leah Z. Ndanga, André Louw & Johan van Rooyen AAWE Working Paper No. Next


Global economics paper no 153Does wealth inequality matter for growth? The effect of billionaire wealth, income distribution, and poverty ☆ The study examines the bank-specific and macroeconomic determinants of banks profitability in Nigeria analyzing audited financial reports of selected sixteen (16) commercial banks over the period of 2010 to 2015 making up to 96 observations. The study identified that existing studies are sketchy in developing economies even though many studies have emerge in developed economies. Effects of the Global Economic Crisis on Turkish Banking Sector. Expenditure-Income Analysis in Turkish Banking Sector and Determinants of Profitability. The bank profitability is measured by return on assets and return on equity as function of bank-specific and macroeconomic determinants. International Journal of Economics and Finance Studies, 2(1), 113-120. Unpublished Dissertations of Senior Specialists, Central Bank of Turkey, Ankara. Using the balanced panel data set, the empirical results of the study shows that capital adequacy and liquidity have a positive and significant effect on bank profitability. However, efficiency ratio have a negative and significant effect on bank profitability. Commercial Bank Interest Margins, Default Risk, Interest-rate Risk, and Off-balance Sheet Banking. With regards to macroeconomic variable, GDP growth also have a positive and significant impact on banks profitability. The empirical results of the study suggested that banks can improve their profitability through increasing capital and liquidity, decreasing operating cost with conscious effort to maintain transparency in their operations. Commercial Bank Interest Margins and Profitability: Evidence for Some EU Countries. The Determinants of Bank Interest Spreads in Brazil. In addition, a good economic environment for financial institutions foster increase in bank profitability. Presented on the 50th International Atlantic Economic Conference. Next


Global economics paper no 153 by

Global economics paper no 153Issuu is a digital publishing platform that makes it simple to publish magazines, catalogs, newspapers, books, and more online. Easily share your publications and get. Disclaimer: This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers. You can view samples of our professional work here. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays. BRIC, is an acronym apparent first used in Goldman Sachs investment bank by Jim O'Neill in 2001. It contains four largest and fastest growing emerging economies (Brazil, Russia, India and China). (Goldmann Sachs, 2003) All the four countries have some common features, as Havlik et al (2009) state, including large territory and population, low income level but fast economic growth. The four countries encompass over 25% of the world's land coverage and 40% of the world's population, and they might become among the four most dominant economies by 2050, as O'Neill and Stupnytska (2009) argued, it is now possible that China will become as big as the US by 2027 and the BRICs as big as the G7 by 2032. Next


GlossaryTriad - Statistics Explained - Europa EU

Global economics paper no 153Further information. Dreaming With BRICs The Path to 2050 - Goldman Sachs, Global Economics Paper No 99, 1st October 2003; The N-11 More Than an Acronym – Goldman Sachs, Global Economics Paper No 153, March 28, 2007. NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided. All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. For general information on how to correct material on Re PEc, see these instructions. To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Leif Anders Thorsrud should log into the Re PEc Author Service. To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations. To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically. Next


Global Economics Paper No 188

Global economics paper no 153Global Economics Paper. Meaningful economic reforms and closer South-North economic ties will influence how quickly North Korea can realise its growth potential. Goldman Sachs, The N-11 More Than an Acronym, Global Economics Paper No. 153, March 28, 2007. ADB Welcomes First Cross-Border Bond Under ASEAN 3 Bond Framework / Asian Development Bank. Benefits and Costs of International Financial Integration: Theory and Facts / The World Bank. Annual Report on Exchange Arrangements and Exchange Restrictions 2014 / IMF. ASEAN 3: Information on Transaction Flows and Settlement Infrastructures. Deepening Financial Ties // Finance and Development. Bond Market Indicators Database / Asian Development Bank. Assessing Financial Integration: A Comparison between Europe and Asia / European Commission. Working Paper Series on Regional Economic Integration. Next


Global Economics Paper No 208

Global economics paper no 153Source World Bank, GS Global ECS Research. 3. See ‘The BRICs and Global Markets Crude, Cars and Capital’, Global Economics Paper No. 118, October 14, 2004. Egypt. 1,153. Indones ia. Kilde: Egen tilvirkning baseret på Sanjaya Lall, The Technological Structure and Performance of Developing Country Manufactured Exports, 1985-1998 (University of Oxford, June 2000) & UNCTAD WIR 2013.© Henrik Kureer. Kilde: Egen tilvirkning baseret på Sanjaya Lall, The Technological Structure and Performance of Developing Country Manufactured Exports, 1985-1998 (University of Oxford, June 2000) & UNCTAD WIR 2013. Next


The N-11 - Global Economics Paper No

Global economics paper no 153View Notes - The N-11 from BADM 4895 at UConn. Global Economics Paper No 153 GS GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEBSITE Economic Research from the GS Institutional Portal at Objectives To quantify global consumption of key dietary fats and oils by country, age, and sex in 19. Design Data were identified, obtained, and assessed among adults in 16 age- and sex-specific groups from dietary surveys worldwide on saturated, omega 6, seafood omega 3, plant omega 3, and trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. We included 266 surveys in adults (83% nationally representative) comprising 1 630 069 unique individuals, representing 113 of 187 countries and 82% of the global population. A multilevel hierarchical Bayesian model accounted for differences in national and regional levels of missing data, measurement incomparability, study representativeness, and sampling and modelling uncertainty. Setting and population Global adult population, by age, sex, country, and time. Results In 2010, global saturated fat consumption was 9.4%E (95%UI=9.2 to 9.5); country-specific intakes varied dramatically from 2.3 to 27.5%E; in 75 of 187 countries representing 61.8% of the world’s adult population, the mean intake was By 2020, nearly 75% of all deaths and 60% of all disability adjusted life years worldwide will be attributable to non-communicable chronic diseases including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cancers, with the largest increases and burdens in low and middle income countries rather than high income countries.1 2 Most of these burdens occur prematurely and can be prevented or delayed, making the identification and targeting of the modifiable risk factors with greatest impact on these diseases among the greatest health priorities of our time. For decades healthcare systems, clinicians, and scientists have focused on the medical, drug treatment model of disease that highlights intermediate, downstream, metabolic risk factors as established predictors of diseases rather than fundamental root causes such as diet and lifestyle.3 The consequences of this narrow approach are evident: the global obesity epidemic and the pandemic of chronic diseases that has now swept the world. As demonstrated by the Global Burden of Diseases Study’s capstone papers,4 and as highlighted throughout the reports from the United Nations high level meeting on non-communicable disease prevention and control ( diet is one of the fundamental risk factors for health, disease, and disability in the world. Next


Goldman Sachs' Next - 11 Frontier Markets - SlideShare

Global economics paper no 153Jul 16, 2010. Global Economics Paper No 153 GS GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEBSITE Economic Research from the GS Institutional Portal at https//com The N-11 More Than an Acronym □ Since we introduced the notion of the N-11 in late 2005, there has been increased focus on these countries Bangladesh. Global Economics Paper No: 134 - Goldman Sachs Issue No: 134 3 1st December 2005 Goldman Sachs Economic Research Global Economics Paper I. The BRICs Four Years On It is now two years since we published our Global Global Economics Paper No 188 Final Global Economics Paper No: 188 Goldman Sachs Global Economics, Commodities and Strategy Research at https://360com Many thanks to Jim O’Neill, Dominic Wilson and Global Economics Paper No: 153 - Booth School of Business Issue No: 153 2 March 28, 2007 Goldman Sachs Economic Research Global Economics Paper 1. The N-11 Dream Late in 2005, we introduced the concept of the Next Research at the IMF Departmental Papers; Research Bulletin; Economic The theme of this year's conference is "Macroeconomics after the Great Recession The Global Housing Watch Global Economics Research Papers - View Global Economics Research Papers on for free. 25 Contemporary Topics For A Term Paper In Economics Good Topics for Economic Research Papers: Current Problems You Can Analyze. Selecting a topic for a research paper often proves harder than writing the paper itself. Global Econ Paper No 201 - London School of Economics Global Economics Paper No: 201 Goldman Sachs Global Economics, Commodities and Strategy Research at https://360com and is now at the London School of Economics Research Papers - Economic Research | Allianz Research Papers. Service & Contacts We expect the global economic activity to pick up somewhat. according to a recent study by Allianz Group Economic Research. Next


Global Economics Paper No 154

Global economics paper no 153Goldman Sachs Economic Research. Global Economics Paper. Summary. ■ Closing the gap between male and female employment rates would have huge implications for the global economyDate. Author. 153 The N-11 More Than an Acronym. 28-Mar-07 Dominic Wilson and A nna Stupnytska. Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature: scientific journals, books and conference proceedings. Delivering a comprehensive overview of the world's research output in the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities, Scopus features smart tools to track, analyze and visualize research. As research becomes increasingly global, interdisciplinary and collaborative, you can make sure that critical research from around the world is not missed when you choose Scopus. A new standard for measuring serial citation impact, Cite Score™ metrics are freely available for more than 22,600 titles on Scopus — 11,000 more titles than the leading competitor. Learn how Cite Score 2016 annual values are calculated. Next


Global Economics Paper No 188 - North Korean Economy Watch

Global economics paper no 153Sep 21, 2009. Goldman Sachs Global Economics, Commodities and Strategy Research. Global Economics Paper. Issue No 188. 2. September 21, 2009. Contents. I. North Korea Risks and opportunities. stability following the 2002 devaluation from NKW2.2 to NKW153.5, reaching 20 times the official rate in 2007. Note to readers Welcome to the third annual report on the global diamond industry prepared by Bain & Company in association with the Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC). Last year’s report, Portrait of Growth, primarily focused on consumer preferences, as revealed by surveys of more than 5,000 diamond consumers around the world. We are pleased that its insights were well received by industry players and the investment community. Building on that solid foundation, Bain & Company and the AWDC have renewed their collaboration and prepared a new report for 2013. In this year’s edition, we look closely at the diamond value chain and trace diamonds’ route to market, offering for the first time a detailed view of channels and approaches for rough- and polished-diamond sales. Next


Goldman Scachs-Global Economics Paper No.153

Global economics paper no 153Issue No 153 15 March 28, 2007 Goldman Sachs Economic Research Global Economics Paper. This again suggests that the impact of their integration with the global economy is likely to be less dramatic. To read the PDF files you will need a PDF viewer such as Adobe Acrobat. Vogl Agricultural Fires and Infant Health NBER Working Paper No. Vogl Education and Health in Developing Economies T. Adobe Acrobat is available free of charge from Adobe. Hard copies of working papers from 1988 to the present can be requested by writing to Susan Higgins, Program Coordinator, 132 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, or sending an e-mail to Susan Higgins. Kavanaugh Access to Justice, Gender Violence and Children: Evidence from Women's Justice Centers in Peru A. Cartwright Understanding and misunderstanding randomized controlled trials In Press, Social Science & Medicine, December 2017 A. Deaton Mortality and Morbidity in the 21st Century Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Spring 2017 T. Vogl Growth and Childbearing in the Short- and Long-Run NBER Working Paper No. Vogl Differential Fertility, Human Capital, and Development J. Spears Village sanitation externalities and children's human capital: Evidence from a randomized experiment by the Maharashtra government C. Selected working papers are highlighted in Research Briefs: Orphans In Africa, August 2002Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient Mortality, Income Inequality, and Race in America, October 2001Does Money Protect Health Status? Deaton What do self-reports of wellbeing say about life-cycle theory and policy? Vogl Aggregating the Fertility Transition: Intergenerational Dynamics in Quality and Quantity NBER Working Paper No. Evidence from South African Pensions, August 2001Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness of Environmental Management for Malaria Control, July 2001 : Childhood Exposure to Illegal Labor Markets and Criminal Life Paths I. Deaton Rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century (PNAS), November 2015. Deaton Grandpa and the snapper: the wellbeing of the elderly who live with children J. Vogl Early-Life Health and Adult Circumstances in Developing Countries T. Menendez Social protection and labor market outcomes in South Africa A. Paxson HIV Risk and Adolescent Behaviors in Africa C. Vogl Crisis and Human Biology NBER Working Paper, May 2015 A. Deaton Understanding the Mechanisms of Economic Development, vol. Spears How much international variation in child height can sanitation explain? Dinkelman The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa T. Ranchhod Evidence on the impact of minimum wage laws in an informal sector: Domestic workers in South Africa A. Next


PROMEXICO

Global economics paper no 153Doesn’t consider Economic Complementation Agreements. Network of trade agreements, Mexico has access to 45 countries 1.2 billion people. Source Goldman Sachs. The N-11 More Than an Acronym. Global Economics Paper No 153. Our country has suffered from rising income inequality and chronically slow growth in the living standards of low- and moderate-income Americans. This disappointing living-standards growth–which was in fact caused by rising income inequality–even preceded the Great Recession. Fortunately, income inequality and middle-class living standards are now squarely on the political agenda. But despite their increasing salience, these issues are too often discussed in abstract terms. This paper–and the Raising America’s Pay project that it launches–exposes the easy-to-understand root of rising income inequality, slow living-standards growth, and a host of other key economic challenges: the near stagnation of hourly wage growth for the vast majority of American workers over the past generation. Next


Armenia and china

Global economics paper no 153Dominic Wilson and Anna Stupnytska, Global Economics Paper No. 153, Goldman Sachs, March 28, 2007. Country Report Armenia, 1st Quarter 2012 Main Report, Economist Intelligence Unit, February 2012. Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy John F. Globalization, Structural Change, and Productivity Growth, with an Update on Africa. Global Citizen Foundation Working Paper 1, June 2013. A short paper on the (mis)use of growth regressions. Some changes in fiscal and exchange-rate policies are called for. Making Room for China in the World Economy, December 2009. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University 79 J. Kennedy Street Cambridge MA 02138 USA Email: dani_rodrik@Twitter: @rodrikdani Faculty Assistant: Jessica De Simone 617-495-1415 Email: Most recent update: January 29, 2015. Margaret Mc Millan, Dani Rodrik, and Íñigo Verduzco-Gallo, Vol. Unconditional Convergence in Manufacturing, February 2013. This is a substantially revised version of “Unconditional Convergence” below. Revaluation of the Chinese currency is not the simple solution to global macroeconomic imbalances that many think. A paper that introduces a series of World Bank country studies on structural change, The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth. Why We Learn Nothing from Regressing Economic Growth on Policies, May 30, 2012. The Turkish Economy After the Crisis, January 2012. Yes, it does exist, but you have to look for it in manufacturing industries. In some countries structural change enhances economy-wide productivity, in others it reduces it. Published in the World Bank Research Observer, August 2011. Paper written for the Center for Global Development, Richard H. When Ideas Trump Interests: Preferences, World Views, and Policy Innovations, Winter 2014, published in , Volume 30, Number 3, 2014, pp. Structural Change, Fundamentals, and Growth: An Overview, September 2013. Published in The Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, January 2012. Globalization, Structural Change, and Productivity Growth (with Margaret Mc Millan), February 2011. Published as Chapter 2 of "Making Globalization Socially Sustainable." Comments on "New Structural Economics" by Justin Yifu Lin. Published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, February 2013. Published in American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 2010 Diagnostics before Prescription, December 2009. After the Fall: The Future of Global Cooperation (with Jeff Frieden, Michael Pettis, and Ernesto Zedillo), July 2012. Published in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, Summer 2010. Olivier Blanchard, David Romer, Michael Sence, and Joseph Stiglitz. Globalization Dilemmas and the Way Out, January 2012. Development Policy and Development Economics: An Introduction (with Mark Rosenzweig), July 2009. The Disappointments of Financial Globalization, November 2008. Next


Global Economics Paper No 153 - Booth School of

Global economics paper no 153Issue No 153 2 March 28, 2007 Goldman Sachs Economic Research Global Economics Paper 1. The N-11 Dream Late in 2005, we introduced the concept of This paper evaluates the global welfare impact of China's trade integration and technological change in a multi-country quantitative Ricardian-Heckscher-Ohlin model. We simulate two alternative growth scenarios: a "balanced" one in which China's productivity grows at the same rate in each sector, and an "unbalanced" one in which China's comparative disadvantage sectors catch up disproportionately faster to the world productivity frontier. Contrary to a well-known conjecture (Samuelson 2004), the large majority of countries experience significantly larger welfare gains when China's productivity growth is biased toward its comparative disadvantage sectors. This finding is driven by the inherently multilateral nature of world trade. Next


Global Economics Paper No 154 Gender Inequality. - 20-First

Global economics paper no 153Global Economics Paper No 154. April 3, 2007. Kevin Daly. Thanks to Jim O'Neill. Erik Nielsen, Kathy Matsui. Inês Lopes and Loretta Sunnucks for advice and comments. Gender Inequality. Growth and Global Ageing. □ Reducing gender inequality could play a key role in addressing the twin problems of population. As “an increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere,” either by “human industry and agriculture” or by natural causes like the Earth has “experienced numerous” times “through its history.”[1] * Some writers use the phrases “global warming” and “climate change” to mean temperature changes strictly caused by human activity.[2] [3] [4] Other writers use adjectives such as “man-made” and “anthropogenic” to distinguish between human and non-human causes.[5] [6] (“Anthropogenic” means “of human origin,”[7] and “AGW” stands for “anthropogenic global warming.”[8]) * Just Facts’ Standards of Credibility require the use of “language that is precise and unambiguous.” Hence, when human causes are stated or implied, this research uses terms like “man-made” and “human-induced.” * The greenhouse effect is a warming effect caused by certain gases that retain heat from sunlight.[9] Without such gases, the average surface temperature of the Earth would be below freezing, and as explained by the , “life, as we know it, would not exist.”[10] The global warming debate is centered upon whether added greenhouse gases released by human activity will overheat the Earth and cause harmful effects.[11] * Human activities currently release about 37 billion metric tons of CO2 per year, which equates to about 5% of natural CO2 emissions. Natural processes absorb the equivalent of all natural emissions plus about 57% of man-made emissions, leaving an additional 16 billion metric tons of CO2 in the atmosphere each year.[36] † In permafrost regions, perennial snow accumulations trap air bubbles that leave records of past airborne CO2 concentrations,[38] [39] [40] and because regional CO2 concentrations vary by less than 10 parts per million over the Earth, these local records are globally representative.[41] [42] * Instruments located on satellites can measure certain properties of oxygen that vary with temperature. Data from these instruments is used to calculate the average temperatures of different layers of the Earth’s atmosphere.[44] [45] * The lowermost layer of the atmosphere, which is called the “lower troposphere,” ranges from ground level to about five miles (8 km) high.[46] [47] According to satellite data correlated and adjusted by the National Space Science and Technology Center at the University of Alabama Huntsville, the average temperature of the lower troposphere increased by 0.60ºF (0.33ºC) between the 1980s and 2000s, mostly from 1997 to 2010: * Sources of uncertainty in satellite-derived temperatures involve variations in satellite orbits, variations in measuring instruments, and variations in the calculations used to translate raw data into temperatures.[51] [52] * According to temperature measurements taken near the Earth’s surface that are correlated and adjusted by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the Earth’s average temperature warmed by 1.5ºF (0.8ºC) between the 1880s and 2000s, mostly during 1907–19–2014: * According to temperature measurements taken near the Earth’s surface that are correlated and adjusted by the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia in the U. K., the Earth’s average temperature warmed by 1.4ºF (0.8ºC) between the 1850s and 2000s, mostly during 1911-19-1998: * Sources of uncertainty in surface temperature data involve “very incomplete” temperature records in the earlier years,[58] “systematic changes in measurement methods,”[59] “calculation and reporting errors,”[60] [61] [62] [63] [64] [65] [66] data adjustments that are performed when instruments are moved to different locations,[67] instrument precision,[68] instrument positioning,[69] and missing documentation/raw data.[70] [71] definitive assessment of uncertainties is impossible, because it is always possible that some unknown error has contaminated the data, and no quantitative allowance can be made for such unknowns.[72] * Oceans constitute about 71% of the Earth’s surface.[73] Changes in air temperature over the world’s oceans are typically based on measurements of water temperature at depths varying from less than 3 feet to more than 49 feet.[74] [75] This data is combined with changes in air temperature over land areas to produce global averages.[76] [77] contrasted water and air temperature changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean using three sources of measurements. One of these was a series of buoys, each containing thermometers located ten feet above the water and at one foot below the water. The study found that water temperatures increased on average by 0.23ºF (0.13ºC) per decade between 19, while air temperatures cooled by 0.02 to 0.09ºF (0.01 to 0.06ºC) per decade during the same period.[78] examined the locations of 1,007 of the 1,221 monitoring stations used to determine average surface temperature changes across the continental United States. The paper found that 92% of these stations are positioned in sites that can cause errors of 1.8ºF (1ºC) or more.[79] [80] For example, some stations are located over asphalt (making them hotter at certain times), and others are located in partial shade (making them cooler at certain times). By comparing data from poorly positioned stations with other stations that are properly positioned, the study determined that the temperature irregularities in the poorly positioned stations cancel one another so that their average temperature trends are “statistically indistinguishable” from the properly positioned stations. Next


Global Economics Paper No 153

Global economics paper no 153Issue No 153. 3 March 28, 2007. Goldman Sachs Economic Research. Global Economics Paper. Looking at those specific factors, our ‘official’ Chinese and Indian forecasts from our economists for the next decade or two would likely be higher than the projections offered here. The Next Eleven (known also by the numeronym N-11) are the eleven countries – Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Turkey, South Korea and Vietnam – identified by Goldman Sachs investment banker and economist Jim O'Neill in a research paper as having a high potential of becoming, along with the BRICS countries, among the world's largest economies in the 21st century. The bank chose these states, all with promising outlooks for investment and future growth, on December 12, 2005. Next Eleven countries have an area of 10 million sq. kilometers while having a population of 1460 million. Combined nominal GDP of these countries is 6.5 trillion dollars. Next


Goldman Scachs-Global Economics

Global economics paper no 153Global Economics Paper No 153. GS GLOBAL ECONOMIC WEBSITE Economic Research from the GS Institutional Portal at https//com The N Please note that WUWT cannot vouch for the accuracy of the data within this page, as all of the data is linked from third party sources and WUWT is simply an aggregator. bandwidth=high University of Colorado at Boulder Home Page – Sea Level Calibration Page: Sea Level Release Notes Page: Temperature Results Page – Page – University of East Anglia (UEA) – Climatic Research Unit (CRU) Home Page – Data Page – Additional Resources: University of Alabama at Huntsville – Distributed Information Services for Climate and Ocean Products and Visualizations for Earth Research (DISCOVER) Project: Home Page – Temperature Page – Temp Page – Sea Surface Temperature Page – Atmospheric Temperatures: UAH Lower Atmosphere Temperature Anomalies – 1979 to Present Note: Per John Christy, RSS and UAH anomalies are not comparable because they use different base periods, i.e., “RSS only uses 1979-1998 (20 years) while UAH uses the WMO standard of 1981-2010.” RSS Temperature Middle Troposphere (TMT) – Brightness Temperature Anomaly – 1979 to Present Global Sea Surface Temperature – 3 Months – NOAA: Sea Surface Temperature – 12 Months – Naval Research Laboratory (NRL): Sea Surface Temperature Mapping Tool – from 1981 – NOAA: Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperature – 30 Days Including 7 Day Forecast Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperature – NOAA – 3 Months: Pacific Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies – Bo M – 3 Months: Pacific Sea Surface Temperature – 1 Year Including 7 Day Forecast: Subsurface Temperature: Bo M Global Subsurface Average Temperature and Anomalies at 150 Meters: Bo M Global Subsurface Average Temperature and Anomalies at 400 Meters: Bo M Monthly Subsurface Pacific Ocean Equatorial Temperature Anomalies down to 400 Meters: Bo M 5 Day Subsurface Pacific Ocean Equatorial Temperature Means and Anomalies down to 500 Meters: Global Ocean Heat Content – 0-700 Meters – 1955 to Present Shortlink for this page, suitable for blog posts and Twitter feeds: I Source Guide: Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM): Home Page – Climate Page – ENSO Page – Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University – Ryan N. bandwidth=high Rutgers University – Global Snow Lab (GSL) Home Page – Maue Ph D – Environmental Prediction (NCEP) – Global Forecast System (GFS) Home Page – Products Page – Data Page – Cryosphere Today – Arctic Climate Research at the University of Illinois: Home Page – Products Page – Images Indexed By Date – Dr Roy – Dr. Roy Spencer Home Page – Current Temperature Page – Uploads Page – Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) – Centre for Ocean and Ice climate4– Ole Humlum Home Page – Ole Humlum Bibliography – OLE Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), Florida State University – Ryan N. bandwidth=high National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration – (NOAA) – National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) Home Page Products Page – Page – Content Page – Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Monterey Marine Meteorology Division Home Page – Products Page – Products Page- Forcast Products Page – Page – Multi-view – Coasal Ocean Model – FTP Page – FTP Page Global – Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) Home Page – Maue Ph D – Environmental Prediction (NCEP) – Global Forecast System (GFS) Home Page – Products Page – Data Page – Met Office – Hadley Center Home Page – Products Page – Global Temperature Products Page – Products Page – Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Home Page – Products Page – Monitoring and Data Products Page – Atmospheric & SST Indices Page – Regional Climate Maps – Monitoring and Data Page – FTP Page – ftp://gov/ National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration – (NOAA) – Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) Home Page National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Home Page – Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Products Page – Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Data Data Page – Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Data Maps Page – National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Home Page – Products – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) Home Page – Snow Analysis Page – Forecasts – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Ice Center (NATICE): Home Page – bandwidth=high National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Home Page – Next


GlossaryTriad - Statistics Explained

Global economics paper no 153Since the turn of the millennium, however, the collective economical weight of the Triad has declined by the rapid emergence of the so-called BRIC Brazil, Russia, India and China - or BRICSThe N-11 More Than an Acronym – Goldman Sachs, Global Economics Paper No 153, March 28, 2007. Global Economics The September, 2003 supplement to the Economist, Running on One Engine contains a survey of the worlds economy, and outlines how the economic engine in America is similar to the single engine operation in a large commercial airliner. Connections are not made by the writers that an airliner operating on one engine can stay in the air for a limited amount of time, but cannot be expected to fly without problems, nor can it be expected to continue its course as if it were running on all of its multiple engines. The economists carry the metaphor to the country, and the global economy. The single engine is taxed beyond its design capacity. The overworked engine could fail, and thereby leave the airliner no other option but to plummet ground ward. In the same way, the authors say that the American economy, should it stall, could bring the entire globe's economy into a spiraling descent. Economics is the study of numbers, trends, investment, debts, etc., that help predict how decisions taken by individuals, firms, households and governments will affect the wider population. In our current world, every monetary decision by major, global powers has an implication on the overall global economy. government also enters the economic sector, and becomes a major contributor to supply, demand, and monetary availability pressures, government policy also becomes a significant factor in charting economic trends. Next


The BRICs 10 Years On Halfway Through The Great.

Global economics paper no 153Issue No 208 3 December 7, 2011 Goldman Sachs Global Economics, Commodities and Strategy Research Global Economics Paper I. The Great Transformation 10 Inequality in all its forms is the defining global problem and increasingly the defining political problem of our age. A monumental body of scholarly research seeks to understand the drivers behind the vast and accelerating patterns of socio-economic inequality in the global political economy. This article, an adapted version of the 2016 Martin Wight Memorial Lecture, contributes to this effort by focusing on a dimension of the picture which has received surprisingly little attention, namely, the implications for socio-economic inequality of the particular form of industrial organization that has come to underpin the contemporary global economy—one organized around global value chains and global production networks. It proposes an approach which sees inequality as arising at the intersections of three dimensions of asymmetry—asymmetries of market power, asymmetries of social power and asymmetries of political power—which underpin and crystallize around global value chains. It explores these dynamics in the particular arena of labour and labour exploitation in global value chains, as a means of shedding a valuable wide-angle beam on the big questions of power and inequality in the contemporary global political economy. As the World Economic Forum meeting convened in Davos in January 2017, headlines were dominated by reports from Oxfam which laid bare the startling—and growing—scale of inequality in the global political economy. Continuing a theme of its research over several years, Oxfam presented updated figures showing that the eight richest billionaires in the world controlled more wealth than the poorest 50 per cent of the world's total population. International organizations tell us that dramatic progress was made in the alleviation of extreme poverty between 19, estimating that over that period the number of people living in extreme poverty (defined as income of US$1.25 a day or less) fell by slightly more than half of the 1990 figure to under 10 per cent of the global population. Next


Global Economics Paper No 154 - 20-first

Global economics paper no 153Issue No 154 3 April 3, 2007 Goldman Sachs Economic Research Global Economics Paper Closing the gap between male and female employment rates would have huge. Two issues: 1) Some footnotes have page numbers following them after a colon (e.g. [17]:153), other footnotes have page numbers in the References section. 2) Some references are footnotes, other refs are parenthetical, yet another group have footnote refs following the parenthetical refs. The economics of global warming concerns the economic aspects of global warming; this can inform policies that governments might consider in response. A number of factors make this a difficult problem from both economic and political perspectives: it is a long-term, intergenerational problem; These scenarios can help governments understand the potential consequences of their decisions. The impacts of climate change include the loss of biodiversity, sea level rise, increased frequency and severity of some extreme weather events, and acidification of the oceans. The two main policy responses to global warming are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (climate change mitigation) and to adapt to the impacts of global warming (e.g., by building levees in response to sea level rise). Another policy response which has recently received greater attention is geoengineering of the climate system (e.g. Next


The next 11 emerging investment market - Asia Pacific Institute of.

Global economics paper no 153Global Economic Paper no. 153. Economic Research Issue no. 153. Online. Available at https//com Accessed 22 December 2010. iv. Wikipedia. Foundation. Inc. 2010. Next. Eleven. Online. Available at 22 December 2010. v. Wilson, D. & Stupnytska, A. 2007. The N-11 More. Economics focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. Microeconomics analyzes basic elements in the economy, including individual agents and markets, their interactions, and the outcomes of interactions. Individual agents may include, for example, households, firms, buyers, and sellers. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy (meaning aggregated production, consumption, savings, and investment) and issues affecting it, including unemployment of resources (labour, capital, and land), inflation, economic growth, and the public policies that address these issues (monetary, fiscal, and other policies). Other broad distinctions within economics include those between positive economics, describing "what is", and normative economics, advocating "what ought to be"; between economic theory and applied economics; between rational and behavioural economics; and between mainstream economics and heterodox economics. The discipline was renamed in the late 19th century primarily due to Alfred Marshall from "political economy" to "economics" as a shorter term for "economic science". At that time, it became more open to rigorous thinking and made increased use of mathematics, which helped support efforts to have it accepted as a science and as a separate discipline outside of political science and other social sciences. a branch of the science of a statesman or legislator [with the twofold objectives of providing] a plentiful revenue or subsistence for the people ... [and] to supply the state or commonwealth with a revenue for the publick services. Next


Global Economics Paper No 134 - Goldman Sachs

Global economics paper no 153Issue No 134 3 1st December 2005 Goldman Sachs Economic Research Global Economics Paper I. The BRICs Four Years On It is now two years since we published our Global A fundamental question in social sciences relates to the effect of wealth inequality on economic growth. Yet, in tackling the question, researchers have had to use income as a proxy for wealth. We derive a global measure of wealth inequality from Forbes magazine's listing of billionaires and compare its effect on growth to the effects of income inequality and poverty. Our results suggest that wealth inequality has a negative relationship with economic growth, but when we control for the fact that some billionaires acquired wealth through political connections, the relationship between politically connected wealth inequality and economic growth is negative, while politically unconnected wealth inequality, income inequality, and initial poverty have no significant relationship. We thank (without implicating) Lakshmi Iyer, Scott Masten, Jagadeesh Sivadasan, Joel Slemrod, Dmitriy Stolyarov, and Dietrich Vollrath for helpful comments. Next